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English

Perhaps from a special use of the interjection O, oh; and/or perhaps from o (one), from Middle English o, oo, variant of a, on, oon, an (one). More at one.

Esperanto

  • From the masculine singular of the Romance languages, such as Italian (amico); perhaps also the neuter singular of Russian (окно (okno))
  • Perhaps from the above (Italian quello, Russian то (to))

French

Corresponds to -ot, -au

Ido

From Esperanto -o, from Romance languages.

Italian

From Latin .

Latin

See Proto-Indo-European *-h₃onh₂- (with nominative ō made common to all cases).

Lithuanian

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *-ā; compare Latvian -a, Proto-Slavic *-a (id). From the Proto-Indo-European thematic masculine ablative ending *-ōd, with regular Balto-Slavic loss of final d. Compare Sanskrit -आत् (-āt), Latin and Ancient Greek ὄπ-ω (óp-ō, whence). In Balto-Slavic, the genitive merged with the ablative. The original genitive was retained, however, in West Baltic; compare Old Prussian -as, presumably from Proto-Indo-European *-os; compare Hittite 𒀸 (-as).

Old Dutch

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

Old High German

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

Old Saxon

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

Portuguese

From Old Portuguese -o, from Latin -um.

Spanish

From Latin .