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Basque

Finnish

From Proto-Finnic *aita. Cognate with Karelian aidu, Estonian aed.

Kavalan

From Proto-Austronesian *(i-)kita.

Latvian

From Proto-Baltic *aitā, from Proto-Indo-European *ey-, *oy- (to go) (cf. iet) with an extra syllable . The original meaning was thus “goer, one that goes (around),” a common source of words for “sheep” (cf. Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian баран (baran), a borrowing from Proto-Turkic *baran (one that goes)). An alternative theory, which derives aita from the diminutive avitiņa of dated avs (sheep) is less likely to be correct, since the avi > ai change would be irregular. Cognates include Lithuanian áita (feminine), áitas (one who walks around a lot; restless person) (masculine), Old Prussian aytegenis (small (quick, restless) woodpecker), Russian dialectal етенька (jetenʹka, name used to call sheep) (from *ěta- < *ait-), Hittite 𒇻 (iyant-, sheep) (lit. “goer, one that goes”).

Polabian

From Proto-Slavic *otьcь, from Proto-Indo-European *átta.

Spanish

Borrowed from Basque aita.

Votic

From Proto-Finnic *aita.