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English

A bed (furniture)

From Middle English bed, bedde, from Old English bedd (bed, couch, resting-place; garden-bed, plot), from Proto-Germanic *badją (plot, grave, resting-place, bed), perhaps (if originally "dug sleeping-place") from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰ- (to dig). Cognate with Scots bed, bede (bed), North Frisian baad, beed (bed), West Frisian bêd (bed), Low German Bedd, Dutch bed (bed), German Bett (bed), Danish bed, Swedish bädd (bed), Icelandic beður (bed), and (through Proto-Indo-European, if the above etymology is correct) with Ancient Greek βοθυρος (bothuros, pit), Latin fossa (ditch), Latvian bedre (hole), Welsh bedd (grave), Breton bez (grave); and probably also Russian бодать (bodatʹ).

The traditional etymology as a derivation from the Proto-Indo-European verb for 'to dig' has been doubted, arguing that there are (allegedly) few, if any, cultures known to dig out beds, rather than to build "pads". However, what the Germanic word originally referred to is not known with precision, and it notably has the additional meaning "flower-bed, plot", which is preserved in English and several other modern Germanic languages, but present in older stages as well. Additionally, the term may have originally been used in the sense of a "burial plot" for laying those who were asleep in death, and from there extended also to symbolise a place where one slept in general (In Modern German, two separate words exist, Bett being the normal term, the rare variant Beet having been adopted for “flower-bed”). Perhaps the word originally referred to dug sleeping-places of animals, compare (with the inverse semantic development) lair from Old English leġer (couch, bed).

Afrikaans

From Dutch bed, from Middle Dutch bedde, from Old Dutch bedde, from Proto-Germanic *badją.

Breton

From Proto-Brythonic *bɨd, from Proto-Celtic *bitus.

Danish

From German Beet (bed).

Dutch

From Middle Dutch bedde, from Old Dutch bedde, from Proto-Germanic *badją.

Kriol

From English bird.

Norwegian Bokmål

From German Beet

Norwegian Nynorsk

From German Beet

Old Irish

Old Saxon

From Proto-Germanic *badją (dug sleeping-place), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰ- (to dig). Cognate with Old Frisian bed, Old English bedd, Dutch bed, Old High German betti, Old Norse beðr, Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌳𐌹 (badi). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek βοθυρος (bothuros, pit), Latin fossa (ditch), Latvian bedre (hole), Welsh bedd, Breton bez (grave).