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English

From Middle English sexe (gender), from Old French sexe (genitals; gender), from Latin sexus (gender; gender traits; males or females; genitals), of uncertain etymology. Sometimes connected with Latin secō, secāre (divide, cut), with the idea of division of the species.

Usage for women specifically follows Middle French le sexe (women) (attested in 1580). Usage for third and additional sexes follows French troisième sexe, referring to masculine women in 1817 and homosexuals in 1847. First used by Lord Byron and others in English in reference to Catholic clergy. Usage for sexual intercourse first attested in 1900 (in the writings of H.G. Wells).

Czech

Latin sexus

Danish

From English sex.

Dutch

From English sex.

Icelandic

From Old Norse sex.

Interlingua

From Old Norse sex, from Proto-Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs (six).

Latin

From Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs. Cognates include Sanskrit षष् (ṣaṣ), Old Armenian վեց (vecʿ), Ancient Greek ἕξ (héx), and Old English siex (English six).

Middle English

From Old English seax.

Norwegian Bokmål

From English sex, from Latin sexus

Norwegian Nynorsk

From English sex, from Latin sexus

Old Frisian

From Proto-Germanic *sehs.

Old Norse

From Proto-Germanic *sehs, whence also Old English siex (English six), Old Frisian sex, Old Saxon sehs, Middle Dutch sesse (Dutch zes), Old High German sehs (German sechs), Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌹𐌷𐍃 (saihs). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs, cognate with Sanskrit षष् (ṣaṣ), Old Armenian վեց (vecʿ), Ancient Greek ἕξ (héx).

Pennsylvania German

Compare German sechs, Dutch zes, English six.

Romanian

Borrowed from Latin sexus.

Slovak

From English sex, from Latin sexus.

Swedish

From Old Swedish sæx, siæx, from Old Norse sex, from Proto-Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs (six).