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English

Partly from Old French vent, from Latin ventus and partly from French éventer. Cognate with French vent and Spanish viento (wind) and ventana (window).

Catalan

From Old Occitan vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Italic *wentos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts < *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Dutch

From Middle Dutch vent (hero; man). Unknown earlier origin. Compare West Frisian feint (servant; fellow; boyfriend) and Low German Fent (young fellow).

  • Possibly from Proto-Germanic *fanþijô (walker, walking), from Proto-Indo-European *pent-, *penth- (to go, pass). This would make it related to Dutch vinden (to find; (archaic) to explore) and cognate to Old High German fendo (footsoldier) and Old English fēþa (footsoldier). The expected descendant in Dutch would have been vend(e), which existed in Middle Dutch as vende (pawn in a chess game; farmer). Final-obstruent devoicing is common in Dutch and was already widespread in Old Dutch, rendering vent as a variant of vend(e) possible.
  • Possibly a shortening of vennoot (partner (in a company)), which is equivalent to a compound of veem ((storage) company) + genoot (companion, partner), but there is no evidence of an overlap in senses.

French

From Old French vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Italic *wentos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts < *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Norman

From Old French vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Occitan

From Old Occitan vent, from Latin ventus.

Old French

From Latin ventus.